Soon after Jesus’s crucifixion, were traditional witnesses testifying that Jesus appeared to them alive from the dead?

“Yes, after all…
  • The gospels relayed witness testimony

      In writing about Jesus's life and deeds, the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John adeptly relayed information only from eyewitness testimony (directly or indirectly).

      See this page to evaluate these 7 evidences:

      • Justin Maryr oft calls the gospels apostolic “memoirs.”
      • The gospels claimed to be witness based.
      • 60+ year old events didn't elude ancient historians.
      • In AD 70, witness-based Jesus facts perfected.
      • The gospel authors didn't lie-invent Jesus-bio.
      • AD 70 historiographers got witness-approval or close.
      • Gospel content is a subset of what witnesses say.

      This helps show the traditional witnesses were in fact testifying to having seen Jesus appear to them because the Gospels relayed that “Jesus visited named persons x,y,z” (filled in by the traditional witnesses: Mary, Peter, etc.).

      But no… (Forthcoming)

      • 1st hand info can’t be stylized.
      • Mt and Lk relayed info from Mk and Q, not witnesses.
      • Gospels are full of lies/invention.
  • • E.g. “He visited us!” says Mary & women

      The women—with Mary Magdalene—were testifying that Jesus had appeared to them alive from the dead. Mary & women said this, we know, for 2 reasons:
      The Jersualem church was saying Jesus visited Mary and this represented earliest Christianity (little to no wiggle room for legend etc.).
      Mt and Jn relay witness testimony, and they report that Jesus appeared to Mary Magdalene and the women.
      This is relevant because it's a straightforward example of a traditional witness—in fact a group of female witnesses—testifying that Jesus appeared to them alive from the dead.

      So what? Plausibly…
      • Mary’s group was lying.
      • Mary’s group just saw a hallucination of Jesus.

      Or in general…
      • The witnesses just saw a Jesus look-a-like.
      • The witnesses just saw a Jesus who survived.
      • The witnesses just saw an alien or hologram.

  • • E.g. “He visited us!” says Cleopas & co

      Cleopas and his traveling companion (on the road to Emmaus) were testifying that Jesus appeared to them along the way. See this page to explore 5 evidences:
      • In general, Luke inherits his accounts from eyewitnesses.
      • In AD 30, the Jerusalem church said so.
      • 1st church strove to reject Jesus-bio not vetted by witnesses.
      • The account is not ultimately a lie/legend.
      • Ps. Mk 16:12-13 approved “Cleopas thinks he did!”
      This is relevant because it's a straightforward example of a traditional group of witnesses testifying that Jesus appeared to them alive from the dead.

      So what? Plausibly…
      • Cleopas and co were lying.
      • Cleopas and co hallucinated.

      Or in general…
      • The witnesses just saw a Jesus look-a-like.
      • The witnesses just saw a Jesus who survived.
      • The witnesses just saw an alien or hologram.

  • • E.g. “He visited me!” says Peter

      Peter was claiming that Jesus individually appeared to him. See this full article to debate these 4 evidences:
      • The A.D. 30 Jerusalem church said so.
      • The Corinthian church said so.
      • Paul said so.
      • Luke 24 “appeared to Peter” is early.

      But so what? Plausibly… (All forthcoming)
      • Peter was lying.
      • Peter hallucinated.
      • Peter suffered a delusion.
      Or in general…
      • The witnesses just saw a Jesus look-a-like.
      • The witnesses just saw a Jesus who survived.
      • The witnesses just saw an alien or hologram.

  • • E.g. “He visited us!” say ‘the 12’ apostles

      Jesus’s apostles (“the 12”) claimed Jesus appeared to them as a group. One upcoming page will debate these 14 example/evidences:
      • E.g. To 10+ after Emmaus.
      • E.g. To 11 (now with Thomas).
      • E.g. To 7 @ Lake Tiberius.
      • E.g. To many @ Mt Galilee.
      • E.g. To many for 40 days.
      • Jerusalem church: “They say He visited”.
      • Paul knew Peter etc.
      • Mk's author knew Peter etc.
      • Lk's author knew Peter etc.
      • Mt's author knew Peter etc.
      • Jn's author knew Peter etc.
      • Clement knew Peter
      • The Corinthians knew Peter
      • No trace of dispute
      This is relevant because it's a straightforward example of a traditional group of witnesses testifying that Jesus appeared to them alive from the dead.

      But no… (all forthcoming)
      • Mark narrates no appearance to them.

      So what? Plausibly…
      • The apostles lying.
      • The apostles just saw a hallucination of Jesus.

      Or in general…
      • The witnesses just saw a Jesus look-a-like.
      • The witnesses just saw a Jesus who survived.
      • The witnesses just saw an alien or hologram.

  • • E.g. “He group-visited us!” say 100-500 “brethren”

      A known group of hundreds of brethren (e.g. 500) were publicly maintaining that Jesus visited them collectively as a group after his crucifixion. One upcoming page will debate these 3 evidences:
      • E.g. 1 Cor 15:6 creed's “to 500” relays witness testimony.
      • 1st church: “Jesus visited the 500!”.
      • “The 500” = the Galilee witnesses (Mt 28)

      But no...
      • It is not mentioned elsewhere. (forthcoming)

      But so what? Plausibly… (all forthcoming)
      • The 500 were lying.
      • The 500 hallucinated.
      • The 500 collectively suffered a delusion.
      Or in general…
      • The witnesses just saw a Jesus look-a-like.
      • The witnesses just saw a Jesus who survived.
      • The witnesses just saw an alien or hologram.

  • • E.g. “He visited me!” says James

      James was testifying that Jesus appeared to him shortly after Jesus’ crucifixion. A full page will discuss these 5 evidences:
      • 1 Cor 15 is was formed by the AD 30 Jerusalem church.
      • The 1st church affirmed 1 Cor 15:7 “appeared to James.”
      • Paul says Jesus appeared to James.
      • James was willing to die for his faith in Christ.
      • James soon became the leader of the church.

      But so what? Plausibly… (all forthcoming)
      • James was lying.
      • James hallucinated.
      • James suffered a delusion.

      Or in general…
      • The witnesses just saw a Jesus look-a-like.
      • The witnesses just saw a Jesus who survived.
      • The witnesses just saw an alien or hologram.

  • • E.g. “He visited us!” say Acts 1 apostle-competitors

      The competitors for being the 12th apostle, referred to in Acts 1, consists of a large pool of well-known witnesses to the risen Jesus, including the finalists: “Joseph called Barsabbas (who was also called Justus), and Matthias”.1 , 2

      But so what? Plausibly… (all forthcoming)
      • The witnesses hallucinated.
      • The witnesses just saw a Jesus look-a-like.
      • The witnesses just saw a Jesus who survived.
      • The witnesses just saw an alien or hologram.

      1. Acts 1:21-26Therefore it is necessary that of the men who have accompanied us all the time that the Lord Jesus went in and out among us— 22 beginning with the baptism of John until the day that He was taken up from us—one of these must become a witness with us of His resurrection.” 23 So they put forward two men, Joseph called Barsabbas (who was also called Justus), and Matthias.... And they drew lots for them, and the lot fell to Matthias; and he was added to the eleven apostles.
      2. Importantly, this group consisted of men. But women and children would've also been witnesses who were simply left out of the competition due to their age and gender.
        Timothy and Lydia McGrew: “In passing we should note that the election of Matthias supports Paul’s contention (1 Corinthians 15:1–8) that Jesus after his resurrection appeared to a larger number of people than the eleven. The account in Acts shows that despite some fairly specific requirements, Peter has his pick among candidates for Judas’s replacement: … The disciples appoint Matthias and Joseph called Justus to be the finalists, and they draw lots for Judas’s vacant position. Not only does this account give us the name of another putative witness (Joseph), it also can plausibly be taken to imply that there were more to choose from originally who met the requirements (cf. Trites 2004, p. 137).” [“The Argument from Miracles” in The Blackwell Companion to Natural Theology (Blackwell, 2009), 610-611.]
  • • E.g. “He visited me!” says Paul

      Paul (Saul of Tarsus) was publicly proclaiming, “Jesus appeared to me alive from the dead!” See this full page to debate these 5 evidences:
      • Jerusalem church: “Paul says this.”
      • In 1 Cor 9:1, Paul says “Have I not seen”?
      • In 1 Cor 15:8f, Paul says “He appeared to me”
      • Acts 9, 22, 26 etc. say so
      • In Gal 1:16, Paul says “revealed his son to me”

      But so what? Plausibly…
      • Paul was lying
      • Paul hallucinated
      • Paul suffered a delusion

      Or in general…
      • The witnesses just saw a Jesus look-a-like.
      • The witnesses just saw a Jesus who survived.
      • The witnesses just saw an alien or hologram.

  • 1st church’s Jesus-bio matched witness testimony

      The 1st church was saying Jesus visited the traditional witnesses. See this full article to debate these 6 examples:
      • E.g. 1st church said: “Jesus visited Mary.”
      • E.g. 1st church said: “Jesus visited cleopas & co.”
      • E.g. 1st church said: “Jesus appeared to Peter.”
      • E.g. 1st church said: “Jesus visited the 12.”
      • E.g. 1st church says, “Jesus appeared to James.”
      • E.g. 1st church says, “Jesus appeared to the 500.”
      This is relevant if the 1st church started and kept preaching that Jesus appeared to witnesses (e.g. Mary and the apostles).

      But so what? Plausibly...
      • The 1st church wasn’t saying Jesus appeared to named persons. (Forthcoming)

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